Medicinal Gardens and their Importance to Indigenous Families in Guatemala

In Guatemala, especially in rural indigenous communities, the use of essential medicine is often forgone due to the social and financial barriers that are present. Even if an indigenous family can afford accessing medical care, they will face discrimination that goes beyond the absence of treated in their native language. Despite these unfortunate circumstances, here at Maya Traditions, we try to empower communities by giving them the tools to care for each other in a sustainable and culturally rooted way.

Maya Traditions artisans and staff standing and crouching in the Chuacruz garden

An example of our efforts is our My Health, My Tradition initiative in partnership with the Daniele Agostino Foundation. Thanks to a first year project grant, four of our partner communities (Chuacruz, Nahualá, Patanatic, and San Juan) now have a functioning community medicinal plant garden and 24 artisans from two partner communities (Chirijox and Quiejel) each have a small family garden. A total of 245 organic medicinal plants were distributed, with each garden having at least 6 different varieties.

Once the gardens and plants were established, our staff led six workshops (one per community) on the basic characteristics of medicinal plants and their various uses, the drying process they need to undergo in order to be used effectively, and how to produce tinctures and salves to treat things like colds, headaches, muscle pain, and so on.

By creating organic medicinal herb gardens, we address health in a preventative and culturally-rooted manner so that families can more easily understand and integrate practical changes into their lifestyles. This initiative has also created a new start up platform that will become an income diversification opportunity for the participating artisans and their families. During 2018 we learned that medicinal plant gardens could not only be empowering to our artisan’s personal health, but also their economic well being.

Now equipped with the tools and knowledge to make their own medicines, a Vicks Vapour Rub that once costed approximately 38 quetzales (approximately $5 USD), can now be produced as an organic salve, directly from the gardens of our artisan’s.

By putting the power of medical treatment back into the hands of our indigenous communities, we are not only enabling improved health but also improved financial circumstance. We hope to see this program grow in the future, where our artisans are not only producing medicinal products for themselves but also to be sold and used as a new stream of income.

To learn more about and support our My health, My Tradition Initiative, click here

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