Celebrating International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

Today Maya Traditions celebrates a special occasion deeply connected to our roots and existence as an organization, International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. The United Nations explains that this day, along with all of their designated international occasions, is observed “to educate the public on issues of concern, to mobilize political will and resources to address global problems, and to celebrate and reinforce achievements of humanity.” The UN and Maya Traditions Foundation recognize that indigenous communities should be celebrated, protected, and supported. For years, indigenous peoples have sought and fought for their rights to be valued, but throughout history, it’s been shown that they struggle to be respected by more dominant societies. Due to these challenges, the UN designated August 9th as the day to bring awareness and resolutions to the needs indigenous peoples face.

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Garden Tour: How We Use the Plants Grown in our Community Gardens

In last month’s blog post, you learned about the importance of medicinal gardens in rural indigenous communities of Guatemala. This month, we are going to take you on a mini garden tour to show you some of the native plants you would find in our community gardens and how they are used. 

Jardín Nahuaá

Before we discuss specific plants, we should first talk about what it means to be sustainable as a Fair Trade organization. Fair Trade principle #10 is respect for the environment and part of respecting the environment means consuming and producing as ethically as possible. Coincidentally, June 18th was “World Sustainable Gastronomy Day”. We chose to use that day to make a post on Facebook about the sustainability of one of people’s most beloved foods: avocados. The point of our post was to highlight the importance of knowing where your fresh produce comes from and consciously making an effort to buy local and in season. 

Read moreGarden Tour: How We Use the Plants Grown in our Community Gardens

Why Fair Trade?

As the world becomes smaller through increased travel, better transportation systems, and new communication channels, consumers are having a greater opportunity than ever before to be able to own items made by artisans from all around the world. Not only are these items beautiful, but being able to bring a piece of your vacation or another part of the world into your home is something special that many cherish. Although there are many benefits for artisans around the world to be able to sell their handmade goods to foreigners, this opportunity also presents a threat to traditional culture and to the integrity of the production process.

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Designer Spotlight: Tribe Alive

From their chic accessories to their stylish apparel, Tribe Alive is an ethical brand that is worth your attention. They have grown quickly, combining social impact and design while appearing as a notable brand for companies such as Madewell and J.Crew, since their founding. Tribe Alive´s mission is to empower the lives of women through fashion. They partner with women in Guatemala, India, Honduras, Haiti, and Fort Worth, Texas and we, Maya Traditions, are proud to have them as one of our design partners.

We recently had a chance to chat with Katie, Tribe Alive’s Senior Designer to learn more about her experience designing and collaborating with women artisans worldwide including our Maya Traditions artisan partners to make that perfect, final design. 

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Women’s Empowerment: Gender Workshops

This month we celebrated International Women’s Day, a United Nations holiday celebrated worldwide to acknowledge the accomplishments that women have made and to show the importance of the rights that women deserve within their households, workplaces, and daily lives. Although women worldwide have made significant achievements in the fight for gender equality, there is still much work to be done.

In Guatemala, there are large gender disparities throughout society. For example, a common belief is that the male should be the head of the household making all of the decisions for the family with the woman working in the household taking care of the children, cooking, and cleaning. There is also often a lack of information about women’s rights including reproductive rights, and common problems such as domestic violence.

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Schools Days Are Here Again!

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”

~ Nelson Mandela

This week, school bells across Guatemala will ring once again, welcoming back students and beginning the next step in their academic growth. Compared to statistics presented a decade ago, the World Bank has reported an increase in children participating in primary and secondary education, with the latter doubling in size in Guatemala over the past ten years.

As one of the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals, the United Nations has declared the need to “ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.” In the case of Guatemala, the ability for children to obtain an education is essential to breaking the cycle of poverty not only through access to quality jobs, but also by fostering innovation that will create new opportunities for future generations.

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In depth with the backstrap weaving cooperatives in Guatemala

In Guatemala many women are denied their rights.The country has a long history of gender disparities and discrimination against women. During the years of the civil war more than 200,000 people died, and most of those people were part of the Maya population. The women were particularly affected, as violence against women and rape were systematically used as weapons of war. Long after the war formally ended in 1996, women in Guatemala continued suffering from gender disparities, as a consequence of the long-standing discrimination against women during the war. As a response to the oppression of women, civil society organizations emerged after the end of the civil war, aiming to spread knowledge about the oppression of women and express their commitment to supporting women’s rights. The organizations have played a significant role in the processes of improving women’s living conditions in postwar Guatemala. Many of these organizations are cooperatives, which are created by people who fight for a common goal and are characterized by the desire to work together for change. The members contribute on a equal basis, and share the control according to the one-vote principle.

Read moreIn depth with the backstrap weaving cooperatives in Guatemala

The ugly side of tourism and how you can make the difference.

In recent decades the world has seen tourism’s effects, both good and bad, on remote villages, beach destinations, and cities around the world. According to theUnited Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) in 2017, there were 1.323 billion international tourists arrivals worldwide, with a growth of 6.8% from 2016. In recent decades the desire for greater good, social and environmental sustainability has entered the mainstream with tourists wanting experiences that are authentic, unique and make a positive impact. However, with a rise in sustainable tourism, organizations and regulations are popping up in hopes to protect the environmental integrity, social justice, and economic development. We have also seen new modes of tourism come into popular public conscious. Terms like: responsible, sustainable, eco, ethical, green, volunteer, etc. have become a trend in travel, creating an enlightened sense of responsibility while abroad.

Read moreThe ugly side of tourism and how you can make the difference.

Doris Skelly is Making The Difference

Doris Skelly is Making The Difference

Doris Skelly lived in Guatemala from 1987-1988, working with women and children in the San Miguel and Santa Rita areas of Xela. For years she maintained connections with these families that she came to know and love, and, as she puts it, “I left a part of my heart with them.”

Doris Skelly with Erin Kökdil, former Executive Director, Maya Traditions Foundation 2013-2016

Though she was unable to stay in Guatemala long term, her life had been forever changed by the experience of living and serving there. When she returned to New York City she taught art in a local school with an ethically diverse population and remained there until her retirement. Since then she has dedicated herself to helping students who have difficulties with reading and writing in English.

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The Goddess Ix Chel, Weaving Techniques and Saving Tradition. Read all the way to the end, it gets better!

I learned long ago that I am not at the center of the universe, but Ix Chel, the Mayan Goddess of  Weaving and her drop spindle, are. Also the goddess of fertility and procreation, representing female empowerment, Ix Chel is said to have founded the city of Palenque and set the universe in motion, introducing weaving to all her people. Weaving has since been passed down from mother to daughter, each generation passing the baton to the next, helping to keep the spirit and culture of weaving alive. Ix Chel is often pictured in traditional Mayan textiles, still being produced in remote areas of Guatemala today.

Before tuk tuks and motorbikes, there was the traje. Originally put into law by the Spaniards, the traje helped to identify the indigenous peoples communities for tax collection purposes. Today, stories of community, religion, history and identity are written into the clothing with symbolic colors and designs.

The traje is made up of three components: huipil (blouse), corte (skirt), and faja (belt), all of which are made by hand on the backstrap loom using techniques passed down from mother to daughter since the 1520s. To gain a better idea of the intricate patterns and techniques used over the decades, below are just some of the more common methods that have been perfected by our artisan partners.

Read moreThe Goddess Ix Chel, Weaving Techniques and Saving Tradition. Read all the way to the end, it gets better!

Meet Daphne

Hi, my name is Daphne and I’m from the Netherlands. Ever since I was a little girl I have been passionate about traveling. I’ve spent most of my life fighting an incurable case of wanderlust.

I studied ‘International Tourism Management’ for the last four years and currently I am earning a ‘Master of Science in Tourism, Leisure and Environment’ in the Netherlands.

As I prepare to graduate in June 2019, I am fulfilling a Communication and Research Internship at Maya Traditions Foundation where I can pursue my passion of researching responsible tourism development and creating awareness of cultural preservation. As part of my internship here, I work with the communication department with daily tasks and responsibilities, do research on marketing and ethical tourism travel and help with ongoing projects in the social programs. One of the projects I got to help with this month is the bed project in Quiejel.

The giving chain started with friends and family of Tracey Stewart, a long time volunteer with OUR Guatemala: Travel with Purpose, who donated the beds in memory of her.

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International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

In recognition of International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, we want to highlight a few of the many exceptional women we work with at Maya Traditions.

This date recognizes the first meeting in Geneva in 1982 of the UN Group on Indigenous Populations. The annual celebration is held across the world, from the United Nations Headquarters in New York City to places like Kenya, Peru and Guatemala.

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Women’s Hygiene Initiative Enriches MT Community Heath Program

Feminine hygiene products are a necessity for women in the United States and internationally, while the low-cost and easy access to these products are taken for granted. In Guatemala, the basic needs for proper feminine hygiene can often be too costly for women and girls forcing them to go without every month. During menstruation, women are left finding household items, like rags, or other unsanitary means to absorb their flows.

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The Fair Trade Test: Two simple questions to ask before buying fair trade products made in Guatemala

In recent years, the terms “fair trade” and “ethically sourced” have been used to market not-so-ethical brands, organizations, and products. There are hundreds of trustworthy organizations around the world that adhere to the principles of fair trade, but some brands and B-corps are incorrectly and casually using these terms to market their products with the hope that their customers will trust the claims. Unfortunately, they are right.

Read moreThe Fair Trade Test: Two simple questions to ask before buying fair trade products made in Guatemala

Maya Traditions has a new Director!

Hello friends and supporters of Maya Traditions,
After two wonderful years of working as Executive Director of Maya Traditions, I have decided to leave the Organization to pursue personal goals.  I have been honored and humbled by the dedication of our staff and Board, the grace of our artisan partners, and the advocacy of our mission for cultural preservation and gender equality for some of the most marginalized populations in the world.  The importance of the work that Maya Traditions does cannot be overstated. 

Read moreMaya Traditions has a new Director!

World Fair Trade Day, May 12th, 2018

Fair Trade is at the core of what we do at Maya Traditions. We empower artisans with fair payment and social programs they need to thrive, allowing them to focus on preserving the cultural art of backstrap weaving. On May 12th, we will be celebrating World Fair Trade Day, and there will be some exciting ways for you, our cherished supporters, to get involved. Stay tuned for fun updates on how you can participate!

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