Medicinal Gardens and their Importance to Indigenous Families in Guatemala

In Guatemala, especially in rural indigenous communities, the use of essential medicine is often forgone due to the social and financial barriers that are present. Even if an indigenous family can afford accessing medical care, they will face discrimination that goes beyond the absence of treated in their native language. Despite these unfortunate circumstances, here at Maya Traditions, we try to empower communities by giving them the tools to care for each other in a sustainable and culturally rooted way.

Maya Traditions artisans and staff standing and crouching in the Chuacruz garden

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Designer Spotlight: Tribe Alive

From their chic accessories to their stylish apparel, Tribe Alive is an ethical brand that is worth your attention. They have grown quickly, combining social impact and design while appearing as a notable brand for companies such as Madewell and J.Crew, since their founding. Tribe Alive´s mission is to empower the lives of women through fashion. They partner with women in Guatemala, India, Honduras, Haiti, and Fort Worth, Texas and we, Maya Traditions, are proud to have them as one of our design partners.

We recently had a chance to chat with Katie, Tribe Alive’s Senior Designer to learn more about her experience designing and collaborating with women artisans worldwide including our Maya Traditions artisan partners to make that perfect, final design. 

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Women’s Empowerment: Gender Workshops

This month we celebrated International Women’s Day, a United Nations holiday celebrated worldwide to acknowledge the accomplishments that women have made and to show the importance of the rights that women deserve within their households, workplaces, and daily lives. Although women worldwide have made significant achievements in the fight for gender equality, there is still much work to be done.

In Guatemala, there are large gender disparities throughout society. For example, a common belief is that the male should be the head of the household making all of the decisions for the family with the woman working in the household taking care of the children, cooking, and cleaning. There is also often a lack of information about women’s rights including reproductive rights, and common problems such as domestic violence.

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In depth with the backstrap weaving cooperatives in Guatemala

In Guatemala many women are denied their rights.The country has a long history of gender disparities and discrimination against women. During the years of the civil war more than 200,000 people died, and most of those people were part of the Maya population. The women were particularly affected, as violence against women and rape were systematically used as weapons of war. Long after the war formally ended in 1996, women in Guatemala continued suffering from gender disparities, as a consequence of the long-standing discrimination against women during the war. As a response to the oppression of women, civil society organizations emerged after the end of the civil war, aiming to spread knowledge about the oppression of women and express their commitment to supporting women’s rights. The organizations have played a significant role in the processes of improving women’s living conditions in postwar Guatemala. Many of these organizations are cooperatives, which are created by people who fight for a common goal and are characterized by the desire to work together for change. The members contribute on a equal basis, and share the control according to the one-vote principle.

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The ugly side of tourism and how you can make the difference.

In recent decades the world has seen tourism’s effects, both good and bad, on remote villages, beach destinations, and cities around the world. According to theUnited Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) in 2017, there were 1.323 billion international tourists arrivals worldwide, with a growth of 6.8% from 2016. In recent decades the desire for greater good, social and environmental sustainability has entered the mainstream with tourists wanting experiences that are authentic, unique and make a positive impact. However, with a rise in sustainable tourism, organizations and regulations are popping up in hopes to protect the environmental integrity, social justice, and economic development. We have also seen new modes of tourism come into popular public conscious. Terms like: responsible, sustainable, eco, ethical, green, volunteer, etc. have become a trend in travel, creating an enlightened sense of responsibility while abroad.

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